‘Balance of Nature, Inc.,’ Fails to Respond to NAD Inquiry into Ad Claims for ‘Balance of Nature’ Dietary Supplement, Claims Referred to FTC

New York, NY – Nov. 6, 2017  – The National Advertising Division has referred advertising claims made by Balance of Nature, Inc.,  which markets the Balance of Nature Dietary Supplement, to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) after the company failed to respond to an inquiry from the National Advertising Division.

NAD is an investigative unit of the advertising industry’s system of self-regulation and is administered by the Council of Better Business Bureaus.

The claims at issue were challenged by the Center for Responsible Nutrition and included:

  • Our Fruits & Veggies product provides you with the real nutrition of over 10 servings of whole fruits and vegetables in a day, supplementing your body with powerful antioxidants that enhance your immune system.
  • We also have a Fiber & Spice supplement that contains the perfect combination of soluble and insoluble fiber to keep your digestive system healthy, raising your energy and balancing out your weight in the process.
  • “Cancer is preventable”
  • Testimonials that Balance of Nature prevents pneumonia, lowers PSA, mitigate symptoms of MS.
  • Once he had finished his formula, the fun part began for Dr. Howard: getting real studies and real results. As more and more people benefited from taking Fruits and Veggies, Dr. Howard was able to provide more and more clinical evidence that supported all the success. As he has continued his research, he has developed additional whole food products that make up the Balance of Nature.
  • Implied: The health benefits in a serving of Balance of Nature are equivalent to 10 servings of real fruits and vegetables.
  • Implied: Balance of Nature prevents cancer.

The advertiser failed to file a substantive written response or provide any evidence to

substantiate the challenged claims. Given the potential impact of these claims, NAD was disappointed that the advertiser declined to participate in the self-regulatory forum’s inquiry into the truth and accuracy of these claims.

After repeated attempts to engage the advertiser in the self-regulatory process, and based on its failure to file a substantive written response, NAD has referred this matter to the FTC for further review.

Note: A recommendation by NAD to modify or discontinue a claim is not a finding of wrongdoing and an advertiser’s voluntary discontinuance or modification of claims should not be construed as an admission of impropriety. It is the policy of NAD not to endorse any company, product, or service. Decisions finding that advertising claims have been substantiated should not be construed as endorsements.